Tesla Semi and One More Thing: A Maximum Plaid Roadster

Tesla Semi and One More Thing: A Maximum Plaid Roadster

Last night, Elon Musk unveiled the Tesla Semi, and One More Thing.

Oh, what a ride(s).

Musk spent the days before Twitter-teasing the event:

Tesla Semi Truck unveil to be webcast live on Thursday at 8pm! This will blow your mind clear out of your skull and into an alternate dimension. Just need to find my portal gun …

It can transform into a robot, fight aliens and make one hell of a latte

This appears to be a game-changer for what is widely believed to a resistant-to-change industry. However, WalMart and JB Hunt have announced plans to buy some of Tesla’s Semis, so there are some forward-thinking individuals in the industry.

Tesla Semi Basics:

  • 0-60, no trailer or empty trailer: 5 seconds
  • 0-60, 80,000 pound load: 20 seconds
  • 65mph on a 5% grade versus 45mph (earning 50% more per mile than a diesel truck
  • 500 mile range
  • Lower drag coefficient than a Bugatti Chiron (.36 versus .38)
  • Completely flat bottom
  • 4 independent motors on rear wheels
  • No gear changing (no gears to change!)
  • Center seating for complete visibility
  • 400 miles of range in 30 minutes
  • Charge at Origin or Destination
  • Guaranteed $.07 electricity rate to refuel
  • Megachargers worldwide
  • Safety for everyone: (Enhanced Autopilot, Automatic Lane Keeping, Forward Collision Warning)
  • Jack-knifes are totally eliminated
  • 1,000,000 mile warranty against breakdown
  • Brakepads last forever.
  • Thermonuclear explosion-proof glass (apparently glass-breakage is a major downtime for semi rigs)
  • Phone app provides service, diagnostics, predictive maintenance notifications, comm. with dispatch

It turns out these is some cargo in the truck…

Internal Combustion Engine: Ask not for whom the bell tolls – it tolls for thee.

Cummins stock is down 5% today.

More to come, especially on the New Tom Kirkham Show tomorrow at 10am Central.

More coverage from Vox.

More coverage from The Verge.

@Elon – why wasn’t I invited?

Humanlike AI robot ‘Sophia’ Creepy; Shades Elon Musk

This is remarkable. Both of these videos are liekly staged, especially the second one, but if she is near this level of interaction in real-life, we are looking at a much better version of The Jetsons’ “Rosie”

“I want to live and work with humans so I need to express the emotions to understand humans and build trust with people,”

H/T to Teslerati for catching this.

Tesla Doubting and Big Rigs

Tesla's original model, the Roadster

Tesla’s original model, the Roadster

Range Anxiety. It is the number 1 reason that fewer people own all-electric cars. I’ve heard comments like this for years:

Weight, cost, space are my only concerns. Versions/hybrids are currently running with success. I see a combination of a small diesel powered generator, battery and electric motors being the most viable and easiest to achieve in the near future. Having to charge every 600 miles? Getting infrastructure for CNG has been tough enough, imagine the banks of charging stations needed, drivers have a hard enough time finding parking for breaks. 34,000 lb. payloads might be a little skinny.

This response was from an article about Tesla’s upcoming semi rig.

I think a fundamental assumption was made that someone else has to build the charging infrastructure. Tesla doesn’t wait for that. Currently, there are over 2600 chargers in over 370 locations in the United States. There are plans to double those in 2017 alone. And I ain’t talking for semis. Or, at least I don’t think I am.

I live in the “black hole” of Tesla charging stations. Arkansas does not have a single one, nor are there any in western Tennessee. It is easy to be myopic regarding Tesla when an MSA of 300,000 plus has probably less than 10 Teslas on the road, and the nearest Supercharger is 100 miles away. Arkansas is also a black hole for other things, but even Mississippi has more superchargers.

But those in the rest of the country see them all the time. I counted 5 at a traffic light stop during a visit to San Jose. I’ve seen them used as Uber and pizza delivery cars. I heard that one is being used as a food truck in Portland. (Ok, I don’t know the food truck one is real, but it feels true.)

Hybrids Are Not Part of the Plan

I Googled “why didn’t tesla start with building hybrids?” and found this post on Quora. The takeaway from Ernie Dunbar is that “…they didn’t want to fuck around.” Indeed, that is precisely why. Hybrids are an interim solution to the all-electric, solar-powered future.

It is also why those in the transportation industry should take notice how quickly all of this has happened. It stems from failing to question generally accepted conventional wisdoms. Lockheed-Martin could not believe an individually financed company could unseat them at NASA. But SpaceX did.

Ford and GM (maybe not Ford, now) probably don’t think that Tesla can unseat them as the largest auto manufacturers in the United States. I know that Blackberry never saw Apple coming, then went through their denial stage until their death. Steve Ballmer at Microsoft ridiculed Apple for getting into the phone business. People told me in the Eighties that personal computers would never be in someone’s home. A whole slew of people thought letting Donald Trump run the country was a good idea.

True industry disruption occurs when someone questions conventional wisdom and starts with “first principles“. Why can’t we re-use rockets? Why do we have to wait for others to roll out infrastructure? Why can’t roofs be made from solar cells, instead of mounting them on top? Why do electric cars have to look like shit?

Electric power has gobs of torque. Battery technology is constantly improving.

Sure, the first ones may only go 600 miles and only have have a payload capacity of 34,000 pounds, but the Tesla roadster (a “hacked” Lotus) was released in 2006, but by 2012 – just 6 years later – Tesla released a new-from-the-ground-up 4-door legitimate all-electric card that outsells most full-size luxury sedans to this day.

Tesla went back to first principles to question design, engineering, manufacturing, everything. For the upcoming Model 3, they even skipped a build prototype stage that conventional manufacturers use to test actual manufacturing processes with disposable manufacturing lines and vehicles. Saved Tesla months in getting the Model 3 to market, and will probably revolutionize auto manufacturing.

The internal combustion engine is dying before our eyes. 20 years from now it will be a quaint thing that will be nostalgically remembered like rotary dial phones. Only car aficionados and collectors will be interested in ICE cars. Electric will be too mainstream and a “no brainer”.

Average American Scared of Autonomous Cars

A great article by Matt Posky at The Truth About Cars:

”[A] vast majority of surveyed Americans admitted to being “afraid” of riding in an autonomous vehicle while over half said they felt less safe at the prospect of sharing the road with driverless technology.”

“[From] a random sampling of 1,012 adults, AAA found that 78 percent of American drivers surveyed reported feelings of fear at the mere concept of being a passenger in a self-driving vehicle.”

“By and large, every study on current and future autonomous features seems to underscore added safety.”

But hey, shark attacks make the news, although a human being is more likely to die from influenza than ANY type of automobile accident. The stats are questionable, but Elon Musk states that currently Tesla’s Autopilot is 50% safer than human-piloted automobiles.

Tesla’s Grandiose Plans

If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it. – Dwight D. Eisenhower

In the Tesla analyst’s call yesterday, Musk spent time discussing future plans. Underpinning these plans, and something I have been pondering for quite some time, is Elon’s conviction of concentrating efforts on “building the machines that builds the machines”.

Teslerati’s Kyle has a good rundown on the plans. A few excerpts:

The addition of newly minted Tesla Solar production to the Gigafactory model means Tesla will be producing all three of its core product families – Motors, Energy and Solar – in a single factory footprint. Vetting this concept out in Gigafactory 2 will provide a nice blueprint for future Gigafactories as Tesla looks beyond the borders of the U.S. towards international expansion.

Can these devices be designed and built to be so flexible as to be able to build anything? Musk thinks there are orders of magnitude of improvement yet to come from automation and robotics.

Gigafactories 3, 4, and 5:

Tesla casually dropped news that the locations of Gigafactory 3, 4 and possibly 5 would be finalized later this year. The obvious location for #3 is Europe with strong Tesla vehicle sales in the region supported by an ever growing fleet of Superchargers in the area.

To put a final point on the ability to think big, Kyle sums up with this:

Building on just the core need for batteries, a modular Gigafactory allows Tesla to move its production into a region in a single step, establishing local supply chains for raw materials while also cutting costs on shipping batteries, vehicles and solar products at the same time. Batteries and cars are not cheap to ship and this move makes sense on many levels.

Great summary.

I’m thinking at this point, Elon Musk is the machine that builds the machines that builds the machines.

Cord to Enter Production?

From The Truth About Cars, comes a report that the Cord brand maybe be resurrected. The 810 and 812 (“coffin-nose”) models are arguably some of the most beautiful cars ever made.

“…Craig Corbell, a Houston oil industry consultant and Cord aficionado, hopes to start production of new Cords.”

“…it is the iconic 810 model of 1936 that most enthusiasts associate with the brand. Featuring a low-slung, running board-free body, “coffin nose” prow and flip-up headlamps, the 810 (and 812 of 1937) remains a standout in the world of automobile styling.”

“…Corbell wants to have a display vehicle ready for the fall of 2017.”

Must be yellow:

cord-812-sc-phaeton-1937_0